Scala at Hello Heart – Adoption and a Bonus Training Plan

At 2016 I gave a lecture about Scala adoption in Hello Heart.

To make a long story short, while I personally really enjoy the language as a developer, we’ve experienced some problems in getting new developers up to speed. The language seems to be extremely frustrating to learn, even to – and I would dare to say especially to – the most experienced developers.

There are several factors that make Scala particularly hard:

The functional ideas in Scala are still new to many developers. While I don’t think Functional ProgrammingTM is necessarily “harder” than imperative programming, it is a new way to think about writing software. Learning ways to think is inherently hard, and the struggle can be a massive ego blow – especially if you are an experienced developer and expect to just “get” new languages easily.

You can end up with wildly different codebases, depending on the language features you use. The Scala language has many features, and it doesn’t constrain you too much in how you can use them. In a typical project, you wouldn’t use them all at once. Ideally, you would choose the subset of the features you prefer, and stick to them in order to achieve consistent style. This means you can see OOP Java-like style in one code base, functional, almost Haskell-y style in another, and any hybrid you can think of in between. Compare to Java code that is quite similar no matter where you look (a loop is a loop everywhere, as my mom would say).

Scala’s syntax is extremely flexible. Brackets? Which do you prefer? Because we do both. At the same time. Or either. Or none. Semicolons? Yeah you can use them. Or not. Hate dots? You can leave them out! Sure thing! Random punctuation marks for identifier name? Amazing! I’ve always wanted a codebase that looks like it was profanityped by a developer with massive anger management problems and an uncontrolled dirty mouth!

All these properties make Scala extremely fun to write DSLs in. And they do, my God, they do. So not only do you need to learn Scala when you learn Scala, you also need to learn the DSLs of all the different libraries used in your project.

All this brings me to my final point, which is that it is extremely hard to just open a source file and dive into the code. Unfortunately, that seems to be a preferred method of learning in our profession. Try that with Scala, and much hair pulling, curse words and cries for help are guaranteed.

So in order to shorten the learning curve, we created a training program that is meant to take a developer with some experience, and teach her everything she needs to know in order to be productive writing server code in about two weeks.

You can find our training plan here, and watch my lecture here:

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